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Author Interviews
5:41 pm
Sun March 1, 2015

Robert Christgau Reviews His Own Life

"I think it's a terrible critical sin to try to be different," says Robert Christgau, whose memoir Going into the City is a look back at his five decades of music writing.
Joe Mabel Wikipedia

Originally published on Sun March 1, 2015 6:07 pm

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Around the Nation
5:29 pm
Sun March 1, 2015

A Standout Student, A Star At Goldman Sachs — And Undocumented

Julissa Arce's tourist visa expired when she was 14. She excelled in high school, college and at Goldman Sachs for years before she finally became a U.S. citizen.
Morrigan McCarthy for ELLE.com Courtesy Julissa Arce

Originally published on Sun March 1, 2015 7:58 pm

Julissa Arce was born in Mexico, and came to the United States on a tourist visa when she was 11. It expired a few years later — but Arce didn't leave. Instead, she excelled in high school and college, then secured a job at Goldman Sachs. Her ascent was dramatic: she rose quickly from analyst to associate to vice president.

But Arce was scared to go to work every day, worried that her undocumented status would be uncovered and she'd be escorted out.

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Music
4:59 pm
Sat February 28, 2015

'You Have To Be Bored': Dan Deacon On Creativity

Gliss Riffer is the latest and perhaps most accessible album by electronic knob-twister Dan Deacon.
Frank Hamilton Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sat February 28, 2015 6:39 pm

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Music
8:04 am
Sat February 28, 2015

Feet On The Coast, Mind On The Prairie: Tom Brosseau's Rootless Sound

Tom Brosseau's latest album is Perfect Abandon.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sat February 28, 2015 10:40 am

Before he soaked up the American Songbook, Tom Brosseau grew up with music in church, school and home, surrounded by the hymnal and folk songs adored by his grandparents. Today he lives in the sprawling metropolis of Los Angeles, but the North Dakota native says his heart remains far away, back at home.

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StoryCorps
3:36 am
Fri February 27, 2015

Obama To Ambitious Teen: 'You Have This Strength Inside Yourself'

President Barack Obama participates in a "My Brother's Keeper" StoryCorps interview with Noah McQueen in the Roosevelt Room of the White House on Feb. 20.
Chuck Kennedy The White House

Originally published on Fri February 27, 2015 11:01 am

Noah McQueen is part of "My Brother's Keeper," a White House program aimed at young men of color.

His teen years have been rough, and include several arrests and a short period of incarceration. But last week, he was at the White House. The 18-year-old sat down for a StoryCorps interview with President Obama, who wanted to know more about Noah's life.

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Goats and Soda
3:35 am
Fri February 27, 2015

Go Behind The Scenes With The Producer Who Made 'Life After Death'

Twins Watta and Fatta Balyon pose for a picture outside their guardian Mamuedeh Kanneh's house.
John W. Poole NPR

Originally published on Fri February 27, 2015 8:54 pm

They hired a car and drove for 10 hours over the most rutted dirt roads you can imagine, dodging motorbikes, pedestrians and overloaded cars all the way.

It was December. NPR producers John Poole and Sami Yenigun had come to see what happens to a village after Ebola has struck.

Barkedu, in Liberia, is a beautiful place, green and forested. Tall hills start to rise near its border with Guinea. Cows and chickens roam around the village, which is built along the Lofa River. A small stream runs through Barkedu, where people bath and wash their clothes.

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Author Interviews
5:18 pm
Sun February 22, 2015

Sonic Youth's Kim Gordon On Marriage, Music And Moving On

Kim Gordon is a founding member of Sonic Youth.
Alisa Smirnova Courtesy of HarperCollins

Originally published on Sun February 22, 2015 7:23 pm

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Music
5:52 am
Sun February 22, 2015

A Sister Act Taps A Ghostly, Afro-Cuban Groove

Ibeyi is the duo of twin sisters Lisa-Kainde and Naomi Diaz.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun February 22, 2015 12:36 pm

The word Ibeyi means "twins" in Yoruba, a language and culture whose influence looms large in the lives of two young musicians who have claimed the word for themselves.

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Parallels
3:23 am
Thu February 19, 2015

For The First Time, An Afghan First Lady Steps Into The Spotlight

Lebanese-born Rula Ghani is Afghanistan's first lady. The wife of newly elected Afghan President Ashraf Ghani has her own office in the presidential palace and intends to play a prominent role in public life.
Emily Jan NPR

Originally published on Thu February 19, 2015 10:51 am

Afghanistan was a different world when Rula Ghani moved there from Lebanon as a newlywed in the 1970s. Untouched by war, its small middle class was open to the wider world.

She had met her husband, Ashraf, while studying political science at the American University of Beirut. He was an Afghan Muslim; she, a Lebanese Christian.

They would go on to make a life together — first in Afghanistan, then in America, where she got a degree from Columbia University and became an American citizen, and he taught at Johns Hopkins before moving on to the World Bank.

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Jazz Night In America
6:21 pm
Wed February 18, 2015

Christian McBride On 'A Love Supreme' And Its Descendants

John Coltrane during the recording of A Love Supreme in December 1964.
Chuck Stewart Courtesy of the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History

Originally published on Wed February 18, 2015 9:04 pm

Christian McBride remembers very well the first time he heard A Love Supreme, the John Coltrane classic that turns 50 this month. The bassist, composer and host of NPR's Jazz Night in America was in high school in Philadelphia, and had grown friendly with the staff at record store he passed on his daily commute.

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