NPR Staff

Pages

Music Interviews
4:24 pm
Fri April 18, 2014

On Latest Album, Gina Chavez Unearths Her Latin Roots

Up.Rooted is singer-songwriter Gina Chavez's sophomore effort and her first full-length album.
Judson Baker Courtesy of Press Junkie

Originally published on Fri April 18, 2014 7:13 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Texas native Gina Chavez did not come to music early on. When she was 18, she went to a country-blues show in Austin to hear singer Toni Price. It was after that she decided she wanted to learn how to play guitar. So she turned to her dad.

GINA CHAVEZ: You know, I said, hey, dad, don't you have a guitar in the closet? He pulls it out and turns out it's a 1954 Martin, which people who know things about guitars are, you know, they start drooling all over themselves.

CORNISH: A year later, she started writing her own songs.

Read more
News
4:08 pm
Fri April 18, 2014

Disaster On Everest Marks Deadliest Day In Mountain's History

Originally published on Fri April 18, 2014 7:13 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Just ahead of peak climbing season on Mount Everest, tragedy has struck once again. At least 12 local climbers are dead and several more or missing after a massive avalanche this morning. The climbers, Nepalese Sherpas, were setting up ropes along a dangerous stretch of slope used by adventure tourism companies. This is looking to be the deadliest day in Mount Everest's history and the worst accident since 1996 when eight climbers died in a blizzard.

Read more
StoryCorps
3:34 am
Fri April 18, 2014

Born With HIV, Building A Future

Cristina Peña was born with HIV. In high school, she was afraid to tell her boyfriend, Chris Ondaatje, about her illness. The couple have been together for 13 years.
StoryCorps

Originally published on Fri April 18, 2014 11:10 am

Cristina Peña was born in 1984 with HIV. Her father died from AIDS, and her mother is still living with HIV. Cristina was told she had HIV when she was 9, but she and her family kept it a secret from her schoolmates and friends.

In high school, she started dating Chris Ondaatje. One day, Chris decided to tell Cristina that he was in love with her.

That's when Cristina sat him down for a revelation of her own.

Read more
The Race Card Project: Six-Word Essays
3:31 am
Fri April 18, 2014

Six Words: 'Segregation Should Not Determine Our Future'

The student population at D'Leisha Dent's high school, Central High in Tuscaloosa, Ala., is almost entirely African-American. Dent says she and her peers wish they had more opportunities to interact with white students.
Maisie Crow

Originally published on Fri April 18, 2014 11:10 am

The investigative journalism group ProPublica, with reporter Nikole Hannah-Jones, has just completed a yearlong project, Segregation Now, exploring the re-segregation of schools in the U.S., with a particular look at Tuscaloosa, Ala.

Read more
Asia
4:08 pm
Wed April 16, 2014

South Korea Ferry Disaster Sets Rescuers, And Fears, In Motion

Originally published on Wed April 16, 2014 8:20 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Tragedy in South Korea today. Hundreds are missing after a ferry sank off the country's southern coast. At least six people are confirmed dead so far, but there is fear that the death toll will rise dramatically. Passengers who were rescued said they believe many more were trapped below deck.

We're joined now by Jason Strother. He's a journalist based in Seoul.

And, Jason, first can you tell us about what happened here? Where was this ferry headed and who was on board?

Read more
Intelligence Squared U.S.
3:15 pm
Wed April 16, 2014

Debate: Millennials Don't Stand A Chance

Jessica Grose, who writes for Slate, Bloomberg Businessweek and Fast Company, says that millennials have been mischaracterized in the media.
Samuel LaHoz Intelligence Squared U.S.
  • Listen To The Full Audio Of The Debate
  • Listen To The Broadcast Version Of The Debate

The "millennial generation" has been getting a bad rap in popular culture in recent years. Millennials, roughly defined as people born in the 1980s and '90s, frequently see themselves depicted as entitled, coddled and narcissistic.

But many — including millennials themselves — dispute those characterizations. Young adults today are tolerant, civic-minded and entrepreneurial, they note, and are thriving despite entering into a tight job market, often with significant amounts of student loan debt.

Read more
Paying For College
3:41 am
Wed April 16, 2014

How One Michigan City Is Sending Kids To College Tuition-Free

Originally published on Wed April 16, 2014 4:33 pm

Paying for college presents a tremendous hurdle to many families, from wading through paperwork and navigating financial aid to understanding the long-term implications of college debt.

Read more
Music Interviews
4:04 pm
Tue April 15, 2014

Perennial Co-Writer Returns With An Album Of His Own

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 8:25 am

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

And we're going to talk now with Dan Wilson. You may think you don't know him, but you do. He's your favorite songwriter's favorite co-writer. For instance, power ballads with Adele? Check.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "SOMEONE LIKE YOU")

ADELE: (Singing) Never mind, I'll find someone like you.

CORNISH: Hooks for hip hop royalty like Nas? Check.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "ROSES")

NAS: (Rapping) Heard you tear a rose from the roots, the rose screams.

Read more
The Salt
3:56 pm
Tue April 15, 2014

Behold Ukrainian Easter Art: Incredible, Inedible Eggs

Ukrainians have been crafting elaborately decorated eggs for thousands of years.
Konstantin Chernichkin Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Tue April 15, 2014 4:50 pm

As Nancy Shute reported in 2012, Ukrainians have for centuries practiced an ancient form of art, drawing intricate patterns on eggs using a traditional method that involves a stylus and wax.

It's called pysanky, and it's alive and well in Ukraine and Ukrainian immigrant communities around the world.

Read more
Africa
6:07 pm
Sun April 13, 2014

Drought Could Complicate Already Difficult Food Crisis In Syria

Originally published on Sun April 13, 2014 7:03 pm

The war in Syria, now in its fourth year, has created a massive humanitarian crisis. More than 2 million Syrians have left the country in an attempt to escape the conflict. Millions more have been displaced inside Syria, forced to leave their homes to survive.

In March, the United Nations World Food Programme reported that a potential drought in the area could significantly hurt food production in Syria:

Read more

Pages