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3:39 am
Tue January 27, 2015

'Stronger Than Ever' Sundance Docs Tackle Scientology, Campus Rape

Alex Gibney's Going Clear is based on a book by Pulitzer Prize-winning author Lawrence Wright.
Sam Painter Courtesy of Sundance Institute

Originally published on Tue January 27, 2015 11:27 am

Over in Park City, Utah, the Sundance Film Festival is in full swing. Critic Kenneth Turan tells NPR's Renee Montagne about some of the festival's must-see films, including documentaries about Scientology, rape on college campuses and Nina Simone, and a romantic drama based on a novel by Colm Tóibín.


Interview Highlights

On the festival's stand-out documentaries

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Music Interviews
5:24 pm
Sun January 25, 2015

Hip-Hop Collective Doomtree On Getting Seven Artists In One Room

All Hands is the latest album by the collective Doomtree. Left to right: Paper Tiger, Sims, Cecil Otter, P.O.S, Lazerbeak, Mike Mictlan, Dessa.
Kelly Loverud Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun January 25, 2015 6:38 pm

Have you ever tried to organize a reunion for some of your old school friends? Everybody's scattered to various parts of the world, busy with their own lives; it makes you wonder if it's all worth it. The seven solo artists who sometimes get together as Doomtree can relate.

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Music Interviews
8:00 am
Sun January 25, 2015

The Lone Bellow, A Trio Built On Harmony And Trust

The Lone Bellow's latest album is Then Came The Morning.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun January 25, 2015 9:59 am

Singing in harmony is an intimate exercise, not least because it often requires singers to change their voices in order to better blend with their counterparts. Kanene Pipkin grew up harmony singing, but says the first time she sang with her bandmates in The Lone Bellow, she noticed something unusual: She didn't need to alter her voice at all.

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Music Interviews
8:00 am
Sun January 25, 2015

Dengue Fever: Retro Pop, Cambodian Style

Dengue Fever's latest album is The Deepest Lake.
Marc Walker/Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun January 25, 2015 10:47 am

The late 1960s and early '70s defined a vibrant, electrifying and psychedelic era for rock music everywhere — including Cambodia. The Khmer Rouge communist movement put an end to that when it took power in 1975, but the music from that era has been discovered and rediscovered over the years.

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Studio Sessions
8:44 am
Sat January 24, 2015

Jazz Musician Jamie Cullum Shares Stories And Plays Live

Jamie Cullum performs live in NPR's Studio 1.
Nick Michael NPR

Originally published on Sat January 24, 2015 12:17 pm

Jamie Cullum is the UK's best-selling contemporary jazz artist. He's collaborated with Paul McCartney, Clint Eastwood and Pharrell Williams. On his latest album, Interlude, he covers some distinctive jazz songs, with the help of a few friends.

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Author Interviews
4:36 pm
Fri January 23, 2015

When Pop Broke Up With Jazz

Frank Sinatra captured by photographer William "PoPsie" Randolph during a 1943 concert. Author Ben Yagoda points to Sinatra as one of the interpreters who helped revive the Great American Songbook.
William "PoPsie" Randolph Courtesy of Riverhead

Originally published on Fri January 23, 2015 6:18 pm

Writer Ben Yagoda has set out to explain a shift in American popular culture, one that happened in the early 1950s. Before then, songwriters like Irving Berlin, George and Ira Gershwin and Jerome Kern wrote popular songs that achieved a notable artistry, both in lyrics and music.

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Intelligence Squared U.S.
4:01 pm
Thu January 22, 2015

Debate: Is Amazon The Reader's Friend?

Franklin Foer recently wrote a cover story for The New Republic titled, "Amazon Must Be Stopped." He argued against Amazon at the latest Intelligence Squared U.S. debate — and won.
Samuel LaHoz Intelligence Squared U.S.

Amazon owns 41 percent of all book sales and 67 percent of all e-book sales mainly because it offers lower prices. But the e-commerce company came under fire in late 2014 when Amazon and the publishing house Hachette faced off over who should set the price for e-books. The debate raises questions about Amazon's growing place in the market, the changing role of publishers and the value of books in our society.

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It's All Politics
1:13 am
Wed January 21, 2015

State Of The Union Primer: What President Obama Proposed

President Obama delivers his State of the Union address to a joint session of Congress on Jan. 20. Vice President Joe Biden and House Speaker John Boehner of Ohio listen in the background.
Mandel Ngan AP

Originally published on Wed January 21, 2015 8:56 am

Facing a Republican-controlled Congress in his sixth State of the Union speech, President Obama took credit Tuesday for an improving economy and focused on proposals aimed at advancing the middle class.

After years of recession and war, Obama claimed "the shadow of crisis has passed." In its place, he asserted, is a future marked by "a growing economy, shrinking deficits, bustling industry, and booming energy production."

Here's what Obama proposed on the policy front:

Economy

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Music Interviews
3:32 am
Mon January 19, 2015

The Decemberists Return, Renewed And A Little Relaxed

The Decemberists' latest album is What a Terrible World, What a Beautiful World.
Autumn de Wilde Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon January 19, 2015 7:37 am

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My Big Break
5:35 pm
Sun January 18, 2015

A Tattooist And A Tweet Take A Band From Tiny Clubs To Tours

Noelle Scaggs and Michael Fitzpatrick provide the vocals for the band Fitz and the Tantrums.
Courtesy of the artist

As part of a series called "My Big Break," All Things Considered is collecting stories of triumph, big and small. These are the moments when everything seems to click, and people leap forward into their careers.

The Los Angeles-based band Fitz and the Tantrums has been called a "genre-smashing" group — blending retro soul and R&B with indie pop.

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