Jim Zarroli

Jim Zarroli is a business reporter for NPR News, based at NPR's New York bureau.

He covers economics and business news including fiscal policy, the Federal Reserve, the job market and taxes

Over the years, he's reported on recessions and booms, crashes and rallies, and a long string of tax dodgers, insider traders and Ponzi schemers. He's been heavily involved in the coverage of the European debt crisis and the bank bailouts in the United States.

Prior to moving into his current role, Zarroli served as a New York-based general assignment reporter for NPR News. While in this position he covered the United Nations during the first Gulf War. Zarroli added to NPR's coverage of the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, the London transit bombings and the September 11, 2001 attacks on the World Trade Center.

Before joining the NPR in 1996, Zarroli worked for the Pittsburgh Press and wrote for various print publications.

Zarroli graduated from Pennsylvania State University.

Women around the world have narrowed the gender gap on key measures of political engagement, health, economics and education, but progress remains slow, according to a report from the World Economic Forum.

Although women are entering the workforce in large numbers, they continue to face wage inequality, and now earn what men made in 2006, said the forum's "Global Gender Gap Report 2015."

Update at 5:45 p.m. ET 24 Governors Now Oppose Resettlement:

In the wake of Friday's terrorist attacks in Paris, a growing number of Republican U.S. governors say they oppose allowing refugees from Syria to settle within their states.

Japan has once again slipped back into recession, casting new doubts upon whether "Abenomics," its much-touted economic-reform agenda, is succeeding.

The economy contracted by .8 percent in the third quarter of 2015, following a decline of .7 percent in the preceding quarter.

It was the fourth time in five years that the Japanese economy entered a recession, which is usually defined as two successive quarters of negative growth.

The government said consumption by the private sector rose by .5 percent during the quarter, in line with expectations.

Twenty years after Serbs massacred 8,000 Muslim men and boys in the Bosnian town of Srebrenica, the Serb government says it is donating $5.4 million to help revive the town's economy.

"We want Srebrenica to become a bridge of cooperation," said Serbian Prime Minister Aleksandar Vucic, attending an investment conference in the town.

A federal grand jury in New York has indicted two nephews of Venezuela's powerful first lady for allegedly trying to smuggle cocaine into the United States.

Efrain Antonio Campo Flores, 29, and Franqui Francisco Flores de Freitas, 30, were charged in a one-count indictment filed in New York. They will appear before a judge on Thursday afternoon.