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The Salt
9:59 am
Thu January 12, 2012

10 Things To Do With A Twinkie

When we heard the news about the Hostess bankruptcy and the possible demise of the Twinkie, we were concerned. And we got to thinking about just how wonderful Twinkies are.

I myself have never tried one, and come from the generation that's more likely to see Twinkies as an abstract object to play or experiment with — not real food.

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The Two-Way
9:35 am
Thu January 12, 2012

Mine's Smaller! Claim About Tiny Frog Is Challenged

The tiny frog called Paedophryne amauensis, sitting on a dime.
Christopher Austin AFP/Getty Images

Sure, it's tiny. But is it the tiniest?

There's a frog in Papua New Guinea that researchers announced this week is "the smallest known vertebrate species" (that is, a creature with a spine).

It's so small, in fact, that the picture posted by the journal PLoS One with the scientists' report shows the little Paedophryne amauensis sitting on a dime with plenty of room to spare.

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Shelby Lynne
8:50 am
Thu January 12, 2012

Shelby Lynne: A Murder Ballad Hits Close To Home

In the devastating "Heaven's Only Days Down the Road," Shelby Lynne looks back at her own difficult history.
Lisa VanHecke

Originally published on Thu January 12, 2012 7:00 am

Shelby Lynne's "Heaven's Only Days Down the Road" upholds a long tradition of Southern Gothic murder ballads — it's based on a true story, for one thing. And, in keeping with that tradition's finest examples, Lynne doesn't narrate a plot so much as allude to a series of unfolding actions, ratcheting up the tension musically as she exposes the mindset behind them.

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The Two-Way
8:45 am
Thu January 12, 2012

Jobless Claims Jump Up By 24,000

Originally published on Thu January 12, 2012 10:24 am

The number of people filing first-time claims for unemployment insurance rose by 24,000 last week from the week before, the Employment and Training Administration reports. There were 399,000 such claims.

Also, "the 4-week moving average was 381,750, an increase of 7,750 from the previous week's revised average of 374,000," the agency says.

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The Two-Way
8:10 am
Thu January 12, 2012

Penn State Will Honor Paterno, School President Says

Joe Paterno, during a Penn State game last October.
Jim Prisching AP

Originally published on Thu January 12, 2012 8:13 am

Legendary football coach Joe Paterno, who lost his job at Penn State in the wake of the scandal over a former assistant's arrest on charges of sexually abusing young boys, will be honored by the school at some point, university President Rodney Erickson told alumni Wednesday evening.

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The Two-Way
7:30 am
Thu January 12, 2012

Judge Blocks Pardons Issued By Outgoing Mississippi Gov. Barbour

Former Mississippi Gov. Haley Barbour (R).
Rogelio V. Solis AP

Originally published on Thu January 12, 2012 8:39 am

Most of the 203 pardons, clemencies and sentence reductions granted by outgoing Mississippi Gov. Haley Barbour (R) just before he left office Tuesday, which ignited a firestorm of criticism and controversy in the state, are now in legal limbo.

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The Two-Way
7:00 am
Thu January 12, 2012

Video Depicting Urination On Corpses Won't Derail Peace Talks, Taliban Says

Though experts are warning it will inflame anti-American sentiment in Afghanistan and hurt efforts to start peace talks with the Taliban, a video that appears to show four U.S. Marines urinating on the corpses of three Afghan men will not affect efforts to begin such negotiations, a Taliban spokesman tells Reuters.

"This is not the first time we see such brutality," the spokesman, Zabihullah Mujahid, said.

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World
12:01 am
Thu January 12, 2012

In Russia, Modern 'Revolution' Comes At Its Own Pace

The Russian village of Sagra has been in the headlines since last summer, when residents — including 56-year-old Viktor Gorodilov (shown here) — successfully fought off an armed criminal gang that they say threatened their community. For many Russians, Sagra has become a symbol of how they say the government has let them down.
David Gilkey NPR

Originally published on Thu January 12, 2012 10:08 am

Russia had one of the world's most famous revolutions nearly a century ago, in 1917. Yet for centuries, the country has seemed to prefer strong leaders who promised stability rather than revolutionary change. On a trip across Russia today on the Trans-Siberian railroad, NPR's David Greene found many Russians who expressed disappointment with their current government. But most said they wanted changes to be gradual, and were not looking for a major upheaval.

Second of three parts

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Economy
12:01 am
Thu January 12, 2012

Project's Promise Of Jobs Has Appalachia Seeing Stars

Visitors view a photo montage of Royal Dutch Shell's Ethylene Cracker Complex during its opening ceremony in Singapore in 2010. The company is expected to announce plans soon for an ethylene cracker plant in Ohio, Pennsylvania or West Virginia.
Munshi Ahmed Bloomberg

Originally published on Tue August 7, 2012 3:42 pm

Ever since the collapse of the domestic steel industry, blue-collar workers living in the mountain towns near the border of Pennsylvania, West Virginia and Ohio have struggled to find jobs.

But last June, Shell Oil Co. announced it would build a huge petrochemical refinery somewhere in that Appalachian region. The plant, known in the industry as a "cracker," could bring billions of investment dollars and thousands of jobs.

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