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Race
5:37 pm
Mon April 30, 2012

A Museum Teaches Tolerance Through Jim Crow

Museum displays include examples of robes worn by the men, women and children of the Ku Klux Klan.
Bill Bitzinger Ferris State University

Originally published on Thu January 31, 2013 3:33 pm

This story contains offensive language.

The ugliness of racism is at the heart of a new museum in Michigan. The Jim Crow Museum of Racist Memorabilia at Ferris State University in Big Rapids features thousands of troubling artifacts and sometimes horrifying images. There are slave whips and chains; signs that once dictated where African-Americans could sit, walk or get a drink of water; and teddy bears turned into messengers of hate.

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Shots - Health Blog
5:34 pm
Mon April 30, 2012

Studies Reignite Mammography Debate For Middle-Aged Women

Karen Lindsfor, a professor of radiology and chief of breast imaging at the University of California, Davis Medical Center, examines the mammogram of a patient with heterogeneously dense breast tissue. Lindfors is among those doctors who say there was insufficient evidence to support the idea that additional screenings would detect cancers earlier.
Rich Pedroncelli AP

Originally published on Tue May 1, 2012 8:37 am

Should women in their 40s routinely get mammograms to detect breast cancer?

Two studies released Monday aim to help resolve that question, which is one of the most intense debates in women's health. The studies identify which women in their 40s are most likely to benefit from routine mammograms.

For years, the mantra was that regular mammograms save lives. So many people were stunned in 2009 when an influential panel of experts questioned that assumption.

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Asia
5:04 pm
Mon April 30, 2012

The Current U.S.-China Stanoff Has A Precedent

The current case of a prominent Chinese activist seeking U.S. protection has echoes of a similar episode in 1989. Then, physicist Fang Lizhi took refuge at the U.S. Embassy in Beijing. He spent a year there before the U.S. and China reached a deal allowing him to move to the U.S. He died this month in Arizona, at age 76.
John B. Carnett Popular Science via Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 30, 2012 5:58 pm

As the U.S. and China seek a solution to the case involving a prominent Chinese activist, it's worth remembering this isn't the first time the two countries have waged this kind of negotiation.

Chen Guangcheng, an activist who's been blind since he was a small boy, escaped house arrest in an eastern Chinese village and was taken to Beijing, where he's believed to be under U.S. protection.

A similar, high-profile case took place in 1989, when astrophysicist Fang Lizhi and his wife took refuge at the U.S. Embassy in Beijing.

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Technology
4:54 pm
Mon April 30, 2012

Europe Pressures U.S. Tech On Internet Privacy Laws

Demonstrators with Guy Fawkes masks protest changing privacy policies on March 31, in Vienna.
Ronald Zak DAPD/AP

Originally published on Mon April 30, 2012 5:34 pm

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Asia
4:54 pm
Mon April 30, 2012

Activist's Escape Complicates Clinton's China Visit

Chinese paramilitary police patrol outside the U.S. Embassy in Beijing on April 28. Chen Guangcheng, a blind legal activist who fled house arrest in his rural Chinese village, is reported to be under the protection of U.S. officials. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton is heading to China for what was supposed to be a routine visit.
Alexander F. Yuan AP

Originally published on Mon April 30, 2012 6:20 pm

U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton sets off Monday night on a trip that was supposed to be a routine checkup on U.S.-China relations.

Instead, she is flying into a firestorm after a high-profile dissident's daring escape from house arrest. The blind legal activist, Chen Guangcheng, is now believed to be under U.S. protection — and diplomats are scrambling to try to resolve the issue quickly.

On her first visit to China as secretary of state in 2009, Clinton emphasized other issues besides human rights.

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Middle East
4:37 pm
Mon April 30, 2012

In Israel, A Rift On How To Deal With Iran

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu embraces Meir Dagan, the then-outgoing chief of the Mossad intelligence agency, in January 2011. Dagan is among former security chiefs who have recently criticized Netanyahu, saying he has exaggerated the urgency of the threat posed by Iran's nuclear program.
Ronen Zvulun AP

Originally published on Sun May 6, 2012 9:05 am

As Israel wages an intense daily debate about Iran and its nuclear program, a rift between Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and Israel's former intelligence chiefs has become public.

The recently retired head of internal security, Yuval Diskin, has bashed Netanyahu and his Defense Minister Ehud Barak, calling them unfit to lead the country.

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Shots - Health Blog
4:05 pm
Mon April 30, 2012

Robots Win Battle For Attention At Science Fair

Budding scientists, engineers and doctors lined up to try surgical robots from Intuitive Surgical at a science festival in Washington, D.C., over the weekend.
Scott Hensley NPR

Originally published on Mon April 30, 2012 4:32 pm

Kids love robots.

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Religion
3:57 pm
Mon April 30, 2012

From Minister To Atheist: A Story Of Losing Faith

Teresa MacBain pauses while talking about her ongoing job search. She has been out of work since leaving her position as a Methodist pastor earlier this year.
Colin Hackley for NPR

Originally published on Thu January 30, 2014 9:02 pm

This is the first in a series of stories on losing faith.

Teresa MacBain has a secret, one she's terrified to reveal.

"I'm currently an active pastor and I'm also an atheist," she says. "I live a double life. I feel pretty good on Monday, but by Thursday — when Sunday's right around the corner — I start having stomachaches, headaches, just knowing that I got to stand up and say things that I no longer believe in and portray myself in a way that's totally false."

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The Salt
3:46 pm
Mon April 30, 2012

Farmers Cheer Administration's About-Face On Limiting Teen Farm Work

Farmers saw the administration's proposal as a threat to their way of life
istockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue May 1, 2012 8:41 am

When the Obama administration proposed new restrictions on teens working on farms last year, labor leaders and child welfare advocates cheered.

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It's All Politics
3:35 pm
Mon April 30, 2012

Romney Campaign Tries To Reopen Obama-Clinton Primary Fight Wounds

President Obama and former President Bill Clinton golf together in September 2011. The former president is campaigning for Obama, four years after the two men exchanged harsh words during the Democratic primary battle between Obama and then-Sen. Hillary Clinton.
Chris Kleponis-Pool Getty Images

Throughout the Republican primary campaign, opponents of Mitt Romney have handed President Obama lots of potential general-election fodder in their attacks on the front-runner.

And now that Romney is the presumptive GOP nominee, he's dipping back four years to the 2008 Democratic primary battle for some ammunition of his own.

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