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The Two-Way
11:46 am
Mon July 2, 2012

Sprinters' Runoff May Be All Off

In this handout photo provided by the USATF, Jeneba Tarmoh (bottom, lane 1) and Allyson Felix cross the finish line at exactly the same time in the women's 100 meter dash final during Day Two of the 2012 U.S. Olympic Track & Field Team Trials at Hayward Field on June 23 in Eugene, Ore. It's their torsos, not head, hands, feet or arms, that matter.
USATF Getty Images

Originally published on Mon July 2, 2012 3:12 pm

There will be no runoff today between sprinters Jeneba Tarmoh and Allyson Felix to determine which athlete is eligible to run for Team USA in the 100-meter sprint for women at the London Olympics.

Just before 1:30 p.m. ET, USA Track & Field confirmed in an email to reporters that Tarmoh "has withdrawn herself from consideration." The association says that:

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The Two-Way
10:36 am
Mon July 2, 2012

Manufacturing Sector Shrank In June, Report Signals

For the first time since July 2009 a gauge of how U.S. manufacturers are doing is signalling shrinkage in the factory sector.

The Institute for Supply Management says its June "PMI" index stood at 49.7, down from 53.5 and the first time in nearly three years that it wasn't above 50 — the line between growth in manufacturing (an above 50 reading) and contraction (below 50).

A subcategory of ISM's report — its measure of new orders — also fell below 50, to 47.8.

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The Two-Way
9:37 am
Mon July 2, 2012

Word Of The Day: 'Derecho'

Where you're most likely to be in the path of a derecho, and how often.
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Originally published on Mon July 2, 2012 6:35 pm

We learned a new word on Saturday, thanks to Korva's post about the devastating storm that has left millions without power from Ohio east through the mid-Atlantic states:

Derecho.

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The Two-Way
8:34 am
Mon July 2, 2012

Mexico's PRI Rises From 'Death Bed' With Return To Power

Enrique Pena Nieto and his family celebrated Sunday in Mexico City after he claimed victory in the presidential election.
Yuri Cortez AFP/Getty Images

"Mexico's old guard sailed back into power after a 12-year hiatus Sunday," The Associated Press writes, "as the official preliminary vote count handed a victory to Enrique Pena Nieto, whose party was long accused of ruling the country through corruption and patronage."

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The Two-Way
7:57 am
Mon July 2, 2012

Finally, 'Some Good News' About Colorado Springs Wildfire

On Sunday in Colorado Springs, residents waited for word about whether their homes had survived the Waldo Canyon wildfire.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

As we said earlier, millions of people in mid-Atlantic states and Ohio are starting a third day without power because of damage from Friday's "land hurricane."

But in Colorado Springs, "it's nice to finally have some good news," Steve Cox, chief of economic vitality and innovation for the city, tells the local Gazette.

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The Two-Way
7:35 am
Mon July 2, 2012

No Power? No A.C.? You Don't Have To Tell Us About It (But We Hope You Do)

Sign of the times: In Bethesda, Md., a Starbucks breaks some bad news. Ice is in short supply in many places where the power is out.
Allison Shelley Getty Images

Originally published on Mon July 2, 2012 2:49 pm

For about 2.7 million people across mid-Atlantic and west to Ohio it's Day 3 without power.

Friday's "land hurricane" — technically known as a derecho — may be long gone, but it is certainly not forgotten. Crews, many brought in from states well outside the affected region, continue to work on restoring power. But utilities are warning it could be next weekend before everyone is back on the grid.

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Science
3:35 am
Mon July 2, 2012

Is The Hunt For The 'God Particle' Finally Over?

This image, from a sensor at the particle accelerator at CERN, is an example of the data signature a Higgs particle might generate.
CERN

Originally published on Mon July 2, 2012 9:17 am

Before we get to the fireworks on the Fourth of July, we might see some pyrotechnics from a giant physics experiment near Geneva, Switzerland.

Scientists there are planning to gather that morning to hear the latest about the decades-long search for a subatomic particle that could help explain why objects in our universe actually weigh anything.

The buzz is that they're closing in on the elusive Higgs particle. That would be a major milestone in the quest to understand the most basic nature of the universe.

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Shots - Health Blog
3:31 am
Mon July 2, 2012

Organ Donation Has Consequences Some Donors Aren't Prepared For

Most living kidney donors return to their daily lives in a matter of weeks, but for some, unforeseen physical and financial complications arise.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon July 2, 2012 11:44 am

Nearly a year and a half ago, Jeff Moyer donated a kidney. It's something he says changed his life forever. "Transplant surgery is a miracle," marvels Moyer. "I mean, to think that my kidney saved someone else's life — that's staggeringly wonderful."

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The Salt
3:29 am
Mon July 2, 2012

Pie-Making 101: How I Overcame My Fear Of Crumbling Crust

CIA Instructor George Higgins checks the slices of pie made by students.
Allison Aubrey NPR

Originally published on Mon July 2, 2012 11:27 am

If you listen to my story on Morning Edition, you'll understand the generational divide that has led to my fear of making a pie crust.

So when I decided to overcome my fear, I did it the right way. I hopped on a train to the Culinary Institute of America, the nation's premier cooking school, in Hyde Park, N.Y. There I learned the foolproof pie crust formula that chef George Higgins teaches his students. "It starts with 3, 2, 1," he explains.

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