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Shots - Health Blog
3:28 pm
Tue October 2, 2012

Democrats And Republicans Differ On Medicaid Fix

Isabelle "Simone" Svikhart, 3, has spent 13 months in the hospital for treatment of a range of health conditions. The Children's Hospital Association distributed a trading card with her picture and details of her case to lobby against Medicaid cuts.
Children's Hospital Association

Originally published on Tue October 2, 2012 6:14 pm

Medicaid is already the nation's largest health insurance program in terms of number of people covered: It serves nearly 1 in 5 Americans. Yet at the same time it's putting increasing strain on the budgets of states, which pay about 40 percent of its costs.

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It's All Politics
3:22 pm
Tue October 2, 2012

5 Myths About The Presidential Race

The flaps and "fun things" that happen during a political campaign might be gifts for the media, but do they really matter?
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue October 2, 2012 4:20 pm

There's always a lot of noise around a presidential campaign — minor flaps that suck up a lot of media attention but are forgotten by Election Day.

John Sides, a political scientist at George Washington University and a founder of the blog The Monkey Cage, says there's no need to worry about a lot of the ephemera that news coverage tends to focus on.

"I'm telling you, all the fun things don't matter," Sides says.

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The Two-Way
2:49 pm
Tue October 2, 2012

Currency In Crisis: Collapse Of Iran's Rial Continues

A 20,000 rial banknote, which today was worth less than 60 cents.
Atta Kenare AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue October 2, 2012 4:56 pm

One U.S. dollar was worth 35,500 Iranian rials today, The Associated Press reports, as the collapse of the Persian nation's currency continued.

Two years ago, the rial traded at 10,000 to the dollar. It has lost about a quarter of its value in just the past week, Business Insider says.

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World Cafe
2:43 pm
Tue October 2, 2012

Iris DeMent On World Cafe

Iris DeMent.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Wed October 10, 2012 10:01 am

Singer-songwriter Iris DeMent was born the youngest child of a large Pentecostal family in rural Arkansas, and later moved to Southern California. DeMent grew up listening to traditional country and gospel music, which influenced her roots-folk sound, though she was 25 when she wrote her first song. It would take another five years for her to release her first album, Infamous Angel.

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The Two-Way
1:49 pm
Tue October 2, 2012

Pope's Butler Professes Innocence, But Says He Betrayed Pontiff

Pope Benedict XVI and his former butler, Paolo Gabriele (center), are shown at the Vatican in this file photo. The pope's private secretary, Georg Gaenswein, is on the left.
Andrew Medichini AP

Originally published on Tue October 2, 2012 6:14 pm

Pope Benedict XVI's former butler took the stand at his trial Tuesday and offered a somewhat contradictory message: He declared himself innocent of stealing papal documents, but acknowledged betraying the trust of Pope Benedict XVI.

As NPR's Sylvia Poggioli reports, Paolo Gabriele, 46, is charged with stealing documents pointing to corruption and power struggles with the church. Prosecutors say Gabriele has confessed to giving the material to an Italian journalist, and that his motive was to expose "evil and corruption" in the church.

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The Two-Way
1:23 pm
Tue October 2, 2012

House Committee: Washington Denied More Security For Libyan Consulate

The U.S. Consulate in Benghazi after an attack by an armed group.
Esam Omran Al-Fetori Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Tue October 2, 2012 2:00 pm

Before the attacks on the U.S. consulate in Benghazi that killed Ambassador Chris Stevens and three other Americans, the U.S. mission had made "repeated requests" for more security at the compound.

According to the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform those requests by U.S. mission in Libya were denied by "officials in Washington."

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The Two-Way
12:46 pm
Tue October 2, 2012

Weather Channel Will Start Naming Winter Storms

A person uses cross country skis to get up 26th Street NW near P Street in the snow in Washington in 2010.
Alex Brandon AP

For a long time now, winter storms that cause significant headaches are named posthumously. Think about the Knickerbocker Storm of 1922, which got its name after it collapsed the roof of the Knickerbocker Theater in Washington, D.C, or the School House Blizzard of 1888, which killed hundreds, including many students making their way to school.

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Middle East
11:40 am
Tue October 2, 2012

Syria, Bahrain Still Feel Arab Spring Aftershocks

Originally published on Wed October 3, 2012 9:55 am

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

I'm Celeste Headlee and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Michel Martin is away. Coming up, can saving money now actually cost you money in the long run? We'll take a look at the effects of historically low interest rates in just a few minutes. But first, let's turn to the Middle East.

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Your Money
11:40 am
Tue October 2, 2012

Can Saving Money Cost Money?

Originally published on Wed October 3, 2012 9:55 am

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

I'm Celeste Headlee and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Coming up, style maven Stacy London tells us about the psychology of fashion and what messages you're sending with your choice of clothing. That's in a few minutes.

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Pop-Up Politics
11:00 am
Tue October 2, 2012

Pop-Up Politics: Beyond The Speeches

Pop-Up Politics
NPR

Originally published on Tue October 2, 2012 12:55 pm

If you want a little background and perspective to what the presidential candidates are saying — as they're saying it — then our "Pop-Up Politics" videos are for you. As VH1 did with music videos, we've added pop-up bubbles and animation to stump speeches to give context to the candidates' statements on the war in Afghanistan, energy and the economy.

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