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It's All Politics
10:15 am
Thu November 1, 2012

The GOP Has Its Eyes On Another Election Day Prize: Arkansas

Welcome to Arkansas ... will it apply to the GOP on Election Day? Republicans haven't had control over both state legislative chambers since 1874.
Fotosearch Getty Images/Fotosearch RF

Originally published on Thu November 1, 2012 11:17 am

Arkansas voters are about to make history, one way or another.

Democrats have selected as their incoming House leader Darrin Williams, who would serve as the state's first African-American speaker.

But Williams might never get to hold the gavel. Republicans believe they have a good shot at taking control of the Arkansas House — and Senate — for the first time since 1874.

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The Two-Way
9:02 am
Thu November 1, 2012

Some Mixed Signals From Latest Jobs Numbers

Job seekers were on line at a career fair in Manhattan back in August.
John Moore Getty Images

Three closely watched employment indicators are out this morning:

-- Unemployment Benefits. There were 363,000 first-time claims for jobless benefits last week, down from 372,000 the week before, the Employment and Training Administration says. So, as they have all year, claims remain in a range between 350,000 and 400,000.

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The Two-Way
8:25 am
Thu November 1, 2012

For Obama And Romney, It's Back To The Campaign After Sandy

Early voters waited in line Wednesday in Miami.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

The campaign calm after the storm is about to end.

Both President Obama and his Republican challenger, Mitt Romney, will be out stumping for votes today. The race for the White House, which was just about put on hold as Superstorm Sandy bore down on the East Coast and then roared ashore, is back on with just five days to go before Election Day.

Romney will be in Virginia. The president will be in Wisconsin, Colorado and Nevada.

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The Two-Way
7:36 am
Thu November 1, 2012

Slowly, Surely New York And New Jersey Start To Recover From Sandy

That's one way to get around: A skateboarder Wednesday on First Avenue in Manhattan.
Stan Honda AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu November 1, 2012 10:56 am

  • From 'Morning Edition'

Life is no where near back to normal in New Jersey, New York City and surrounding areas that were punched hard by Superstorm Sandy, and it won't be for days if not weeks.

But on Morning Edition, NPR correspondents in Manhattan, Queens, Newark, N.J., and Stamford, Conn., were reporting that:

-- Limited subway service has been restored in Manhattan.

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World
5:59 am
Thu November 1, 2012

Russia Set To Redefine Treason, Sparking Fears

Originally published on Thu November 1, 2012 6:41 am

Russia's parliament has approved an expanded legal definition of high treason, prompting accusations that President Vladimir Putin's government wants to further crack down on opponents.

Supporters say the proposed changes bring Russia's law up-to-date and will help the country's security service counter modern forms of spying and interference by foreign governments.

Opponents, including human rights groups, say the bill's language has been made so vague that it could potentially be used to punish almost any Russian who has contacts with foreigners

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Shots - Health News
5:58 am
Thu November 1, 2012

Sandy Leaves Long List Of Health Threats

People look at homes and businesses destroyed during Superstorm Sandy on Tuesday in the Rockaway section of Queens, N.Y.
Spencer Plat Getty Images

Originally published on Thu November 1, 2012 6:36 pm

Public health officials are warning that people in areas devastated by Superstorm Sandy face many risks in the aftermath and are urging people to protect themselves from health threats in the water, air and even their refrigerators.

As millions of people try to put their lives back together, the most obvious threat is the floodwaters themselves. In many places, the water could be a toxic stew.

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Europe
5:06 am
Thu November 1, 2012

A Crusading Journalist's Arrest Spurs Greek Anger

Journalist Kostas Vaxevanis waits to appear in court in Athens on Monday. Vaxevanis was arrested for the publication of 2,059 names of people alleged to have accounts in a Swiss bank.
Orestis Panagiotou EPA/Landov

Originally published on Thu November 1, 2012 6:41 am

The Greek government faces widespread condemnation for prosecuting Kostas Vaxevanis, a 46-year-old investigative journalist who recently published the names of Greeks who may have sent billions to Swiss bank accounts.

Vaxevanis, one of Greece's best-known reporters, is in court in Athens on Thursday to face charges that he violated data protection laws by publishing the list of names in Hot Doc, the biweekly magazine he edits. If convicted, he faces up to five years in prison.

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It's All Politics
7:12 pm
Wed October 31, 2012

The Destructive Storm That Built An Unlikely Political Bridge

President Obama and New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie at the Brigantine Beach Community Center in Brigantine, N.J., where they met with local residents displaced by Sandy.
Pablo Martinez Monsivais AP

Though Superstorm Sandy destroyed much in its path, it did apparently build at least one bridge, that of bipartisanship between President Obama and New Jersey's Republican Gov. Chris Christie.

Christie, a strong ally of Mitt Romney, the GOP presidential nominee, and a key critic of the president before the storm, has had little but praise for Obama for the assistance provided to New Jersey leading into the epic storm, which hit this week.

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Shots - Health News
6:32 pm
Wed October 31, 2012

Cancer, Heart Research Threatened By Power Outage At NYU Hospital

Researchers at New York University Hospital worry the mice they use to study human disease may have perished in the flooding caused by Superstorm Sandy.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed October 31, 2012 7:29 pm

ABC News and the New York Daily News are reporting that cells, tissues, mice and rats used for medical research may have been lost as New York University Hospital approaches its third day without power. The losses could set researchers back years.

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Shots - Health News
6:13 pm
Wed October 31, 2012

Before Sandy Hit U.S., Storm Was A Killer In Haiti

Hurricane Sandy's tear across the Caribbean left at least 54 dead in Haiti, where many people still live in tents because of damage from the 2010 earthquake.
Thony Belizaire AFP/Getty Images

Hurricane Sandy only sideswiped Haiti during its early days. But reports so far suggest that even this indirect hit led to nearly as many deaths there as in the U.S. after the storm made landfall on the Mid-Atlantic coast.

As of Wednesday, Haiti had documented 54 deaths caused by Sandy — most in the nation's southern peninsula, which points toward Jamaica. Another 21 Haitians were still counted as missing, and many fear the death toll will rise as officials reach affected areas isolated by impassable roads and ruined bridges.

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