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Europe
4:59 pm
Thu March 14, 2013

As Global Chains Move In, The Champs Elysees Gets A New Look

Diners eat at Fouquet's restaurant, a landmark on the Champs Elysees in Paris for more than a century. Traditional cafes and shops are steadily giving way to large global chains.
Thomas Coex AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu March 14, 2013 6:49 pm

Once known as the most beautiful avenue in the world, the Champs Elysees is changing. Some Parisians fear it's starting to look like any American shopping mall as high rents and global chains steadily alter its appearance.

"We just try to keep a sort of diversity on the Champs Elysees, with the cinemas, with restaurants, with cafes and shops," says Deputy Mayor Lynn Cohen-Solal. "We don't think the laws of the natural market, the free market, make for a good Champs Elysees."

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Middle East
4:55 pm
Thu March 14, 2013

Courts Become A Battleground For Secularists, Islamists In Syria

An Islamist rebel group in Aleppo called "the Authority for the Promotion of Virtue and Supporting the Oppressed" reviews applications for aid on Feb. 25. In addition to handing out aid, the Islamist group says it is carrying out civilian administration in parts of Aleppo.
Hamid Khatib Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Thu March 14, 2013 6:49 pm

In rebel-held parts of Syria, a clash of ideologies is playing out. Powerful Islamist brigades are competing with pro-democracy civilians to shape Syria's future.

One battlefront is in the courts. In many areas in northern Syria, Islamists have set up religious courts that deliver rulings under Shariah, or Islamic law — a fundamental change in Syria's civil legal system.

This is evident on a recent day in a courtroom in the northern Syrian city of Azaz.

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The Two-Way
4:36 pm
Thu March 14, 2013

'I Am Not A Sixth Grader': Sens. Feinstein, Cruz Spar On 2nd Amendment

Pictures of Newtown's Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting victims are displayed as Senate Judiciary Committee chairperson Dianne Feinstein speaks during a hearing on "The Assault Weapons Ban of 2013" at the Hart Senate Office Building in Washington, DC, on February 27, 2013.
Jewel Samad AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue March 26, 2013 4:58 pm

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Environment
4:34 pm
Thu March 14, 2013

As His Home Melts Away, Teenager Sues Alaska

Nelson Kanuk, a senior at Mt. Edgecumbe High School, is one of six Alaskan youth suing the state, asking it to pay more attention to climate change.
Ed Ronco for NPR

Originally published on Thu March 14, 2013 6:49 pm

Nelson Kanuk's house is built on a melting tundra. In a year or two, it could be gone.

So the 18-year-old Yup'ik Eskimo is suing the state of Alaska, arguing the state needs to take more action on climate change.

"The river that runs in front of my house is called the Kugkaktlik River, and it means 'the middle one' in the Yup'ik language," Kanuk says.

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The Fast World Of Fast Fashion
4:28 pm
Thu March 14, 2013

Showing Off Shopping Sprees, Fashion 'Haulers' Cash In Online

Abigail Moscaritolo holds up a recent fashion find on a "haul video." The YouTube trend has become so popular that fashion retailers are approaching haulers to promote their products online.
AbbyLynn401/YouTube

Originally published on Thu March 14, 2013 6:49 pm

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Food
4:18 pm
Thu March 14, 2013

Molly Malone: A Soup And Song For St. Patrick's Day

Rachel Allen's recipe for Molly Malone's Cockle and Mussel Chowder derives its name from a popular Irish folk song.
David Loftus

Originally published on Tue March 26, 2013 6:48 pm

There's always the temptation of heading to an Irish pub, grabbing a pint of Guinness and chowing down on some cabbage and potatoes when March 17 rolls around.

However, there's much more to Irish cuisine than that, says Rachel Allen, a well-known TV chef in Ireland who is appreciated for her simple, doable recipes that champion the country's fresh produce, meats and seafood.

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The Two-Way
3:21 pm
Thu March 14, 2013

After Weeks Of Wrangling, An Israeli Government Takes Shape

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu arrives for a meeting in Israel's parliament, the Knesset, on Thursday. Netanyahu has reached agreement with other factions to form a coalition government following an election in January.
Gali Tibbon AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun March 17, 2013 9:55 am

Israel appears to have a new government, nearly two months after parliamentary elections.

Since the voting in January, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has been trying to put together the pieces of a puzzle that just would not fit.

If he included traditional allies, such as the religious parties, he would close out a chance of forming a government with a popular political newcomer, Yair Lapid.

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The Two-Way
3:19 pm
Thu March 14, 2013

'47 Percent' Video Maker: 'Didn't Go There With A Grudge Against Romney'

Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney during an October 2012 campaign rally in Fishersville, Va.
Jewel Samad AFP/Getty Images

The man who videotaped 2012 Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney infamous comments about the "47 percent" has stepped out of the shadows.

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The Two-Way
2:40 pm
Thu March 14, 2013

Detroit Is 'Olympics Of Restructuring,' New Emergency Manager Says

Kevyn Orr, "a high-powered Washington, D.C., lawyer and University of Michigan graduate who worked on Chrysler's 2009 bankruptcy restructuring," has been given the job of straightening out the city of Detroit's desperate financial mess, the Detroit Free Press writes.

Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder (R), who earlier this month declared that the city is in a financial emergency, tapped Orr with the job Thursday.

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The Two-Way
2:23 pm
Thu March 14, 2013

Pope Francis' Sister: 'I Prayed That He Wouldn't Be Chosen'

A man in San Salvador sells a newspaper with the announcement of the election of Argentina's cardinal Jorge Mario Bergoglio as the new Pope Francis.
Jose Cabezas AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu March 14, 2013 3:24 pm

As the sun rose over Latin America this morning, we're getting a clearer picture of how Cardinal Jorge Mario Bergoglio — now Pope Francis — was viewed in his home of Argentina and what the first pope from the New World could mean for the continent.

We've read through dozens of news outlets from the region to bring you highlights:

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