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The Two-Way
7:22 am
Wed March 27, 2013

Petraeus Apologizes, Says Fall From Grace Was 'My Own Doing'

Former CIA director and retired Gen. David Petraeus during his address Tuesday at the University of Southern California.
Frederic J. Brown AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed March 27, 2013 11:33 am

Stepping out of the shadows and into the spotlight for one of the first times since he resigned from his job last November because of an extramarital affair, former CIA Director David Petraeus said Tuesday night he is "keenly aware that the reason for my recent journey was my own doing."

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The Two-Way
7:13 am
Wed March 27, 2013

Book News: Fifty Shades Of Greenbacks: Random House Profits Jump

cover of Fifty Shades Freed

Originally published on Wed March 27, 2013 10:18 am

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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The Two-Way
6:42 am
Wed March 27, 2013

Day 1 Didn't Tell Us Too Much About Day 2 Of Same-Sex Marriage Cases

An artist's sketch of the scene inside the U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday.
Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Wed March 27, 2013 11:22 am

  • From 'Morning Edition': Nina Totenberg previews Wednesday's case

As we wait for the Supreme Court to convene again at 10 a.m. ET and begin the second of two historic days of oral arguments focusing on legal issues surrounding same-sex marriage, there's a natural question:

Did Day 1 — a case about California's Proposition 8 ban on gay marriage — tell us much about how the justices will tackle Wednesday's case?

NPR's Nina Totenberg told us Tuesday that the short answer is no.

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All Tech Considered
3:35 am
Wed March 27, 2013

Solar-Powered Plane Uses Its Lightness To Fly In The Dark

The Solar Impulse, a solar-powered plane, flies over Switzerland. The makers will be journeying across the U.S. this spring, hoping the flight helps challenge assumptions about what solar technology can do.
Courtesy of Solar Impulse

Originally published on Wed March 27, 2013 7:54 am

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Media
3:34 am
Wed March 27, 2013

Looking For 'Oxygen,' Small Papers Erect Digital Pay Walls

In Long Beach, Wash., Chinook Observer editor and publisher Matt Winters has overseen his paper's transition to the Internet and, more recently, to a pay wall.
Ashley Gross for NPR

Originally published on Wed March 27, 2013 8:38 am

The Washington Post and the San Francisco Chronicle recently said they will start charging readers for online content, joining big papers like The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal. Some large papers have made it work because they offer a lot of unique content.

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Financial Basics For Baby Boomers
3:33 am
Wed March 27, 2013

Planning For Retirement When Savings Fall Short

For most Americans, the math for a comfortable retirement may never add up.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed March 27, 2013 8:04 am

For most Americans, the math for a comfortable retirement may never add up.

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All Tech Considered
3:32 am
Wed March 27, 2013

More Than Just Angry Birds, Apps Can Have A Humanitarian Side Too

University of Washington computer science student Laura McFarlane and her team work on their smartphone app aimed at helping girls being illegally trafficked get help.
Sara Lerner NPR

Originally published on Mon April 1, 2013 4:13 pm

There's a trend in the startup world toward combining business and smartphone apps with altruistic goals.

At a recent hackathon, where tech developers get together to create new apps and programs in a short amount of time, about a dozen University of Washington computer science students work diligently on their projects.

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Education
3:32 am
Wed March 27, 2013

Phoenix Schools Under Fire For Program Linked To Scientology

Wooden classroom desks
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed March 27, 2013 9:37 am

A group of Phoenix charter schools is facing criticism for using a teaching tool based on the work of L. Ron Hubbard, best known for founding the Church of Scientology.

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Education
3:31 am
Wed March 27, 2013

A Hot Topic: Climate Change Coming To Classrooms

For the first time, new nationwide science standards recommend teaching K-12 students about climate change.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed March 27, 2013 1:29 pm

By the time today's K-12 students grow up, the challenges posed by climate change are expected to be severe and sweeping. Now, for the first time, new nationwide science standards due out soon will recommend that U.S. public school students learn about the climatic shift taking place.

Mark McCaffrey of the National Center for Science Education says the lessons will fill a big gap.

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Sports
10:03 pm
Tue March 26, 2013

It's Been An Ugly Year For College Basketball

This photo illustration released by Adidas shows the uniforms for NCAA basketball teams (from left) University of Cincinnati, University of Kansas, University of Notre Dame, Baylor University, UCLA and the University of Louisville.
Aaron Hewitt AP

Originally published on Wed March 27, 2013 4:40 am

There once was a wise old basketball coach named Arad McCutchan who led the Evansville Purple Aces to five national championships in the small-college division, dressing his Purple Aces in bright orange T-shirts. I've been reminded of this recently as a number of grubby athletic directors have sold out to the sporting goods companies, allowing their teams to be costumed in the most hideous outfits.

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