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The Two-Way
7:43 am
Mon May 13, 2013

Book News: Mich. School System Won't Ban Anne Frank's 'Pornographic' Diary

Anne Frank is seen at Amsterdam Town Hall in July 1941.
AP

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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The Two-Way
7:34 am
Mon May 13, 2013

In Pakistan, Sharif Turns To Unstable Nation's Dire Problems

Nawaz Sharif, who will lead Pakistan's next government, at a campaign rally last week.
T. Mughal EPA /LANDOV

Originally published on Mon May 13, 2013 10:19 am

With a commanding lead for his party in the vote count following Saturday's parliamentary elections, former Pakistani Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif is returning to power with a clear mandate to focus on the grave problems facing his nation, as NPR's Julie McCarthy reports from Lahore for Morning Edition.

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All Tech Considered
3:06 am
Mon May 13, 2013

Google Fights Glass Backlash Before It Even Hits The Street

A visitor at the "NEXT Berlin" conference tries out Google Glass on April 24 in Berlin.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon May 13, 2013 11:57 am

Google Glass isn't even for sale yet, but it's already facing backlash.

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Shots - Health News
3:02 am
Mon May 13, 2013

Cases Of Mysterious Valley Fever Rise In American Southwest

Emily Gorospe, 8, loves to dance and usually can't sit still, so her parents started to worry when she became very tired two years ago. Emily was eventually diagnosed with valley fever, a fungal disease that 150,000 people contract each year.
Daniel Casarez/Vida en el Valle/Reporting on Health Collaborative

Originally published on Tue September 24, 2013 10:11 am

When she was just 6, Emily Gorospe became very tired and sick. The spunky girl, now 8, developed a fever that wouldn't go away, and red blotches appeared across her body.

"She's got so much energy usually," says Emily's mother, Valerie Gorospe. "Just walking from one part of the house ... she was drained." The little girl was also very pale. "She just didn't look like herself," Valerie recalls.

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Code Switch
6:51 pm
Sun May 12, 2013

Checking More Than One Box: A Growing Multiracial Nation

Thien-Kim Lam (left) and Larry Bright (right) with their 3-year-old son and 7-year-old daughter, are a multiracial family. They represent a growing segment of American families that are inter-racial and whose children identify as both races.
Courtesy of Thien-Kim Lam

Originally published on Sun May 12, 2013 8:35 pm

Larry Bright holds his 3-year-old son's hand while the boy steps through a leafy playground in Silver Spring, Md., and practices counting his numbers in English.

At the top of the slide, the boy begins counting in his other language: Vietnamese.

Bright, the boy's father, is African-American; his mother, Thien Kim Lam, is Vietnamese. The couple has two children.

"They are a perfect mix between the two of us," Lam tells Arun Rath, host of weekends on All Things Considered.

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The Two-Way
5:12 pm
Sun May 12, 2013

Seth Myers Named Host Of NBC's 'Late Night'

Originally published on Sun May 12, 2013 5:57 pm

Comedian Seth Meyers will replace Jimmy Fallon on NBC's Late Night, the network announced Sunday.

Meyers, the longtime SNL cast member who anchors the show's "Weekend Update" segment, will take the 12:35 a.m. segment from Fallon, who's replacing Jay Leno as host of the Tonight show.

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The Salt
4:27 pm
Sun May 12, 2013

Is It Safe To Use Compost Made From Treated Human Waste?

Originally published on Wed May 15, 2013 11:46 am

Any gardener will tell you that compost is "black gold," essential to cultivating vigorous, flavorful crops. But it always feels like there's never enough, and its weight and bulk make it tough stuff to cart around.

I belong to a community garden in Washington, D.C., that can't get its hands on enough compost. So you can imagine my delight when I learned that the U.S. Composting Council was connecting community gardeners with free material from local facilities through its Million Tomato Compost Campaign.

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All Tech Considered
3:48 pm
Sun May 12, 2013

New Closed-Captioning Glasses Help Deaf Go Out To The Movies

Sony's Entertainment Access Glasses, seen here in a prototype image, display captions for deaf and hard-of-hearing moviegoers.
Sony Entertainment

Originally published on Mon May 20, 2013 3:30 pm

There will be a special attraction for deaf people in theaters nationwide soon. By the end of this month, Regal Cinemas plans to have distributed closed-captioning glasses to 6,000 screens across the country.

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The Two-Way
3:05 pm
Sun May 12, 2013

Banksy Mural May Be Coming To U.S. After All

A man inspects a plastic cover placed over Slave Labour, an artwork attributed to Banksy, in London. This piece of art was put up for sale in Miami last February, but the ensuing outrage led to the auction's cancellation. The mural is now part of an exhibition in London, and is is expected to move to the U.S. afterward.
Peter Macdiarmid Getty Images

Originally published on Mon May 13, 2013 6:00 am

You might remember the story of the uproar earlier this year over a piece of art by the mysterious graffiti artist Banksy that disappeared from its home on a wall in north London and ended up on the auction block in Miami.

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Around the Nation
1:47 pm
Sun May 12, 2013

For Year-Round Buzz, Beekeepers 'Fast-Forward Darwinism'

The Plymouth County Beekeepers Association distributed more than 500 crates of honeybees this spring.
Katherine Perry for NPR

Originally published on Sun May 12, 2013 6:51 pm

Beekeepers In Massachusetts are taking the mission to save the bees into their own hands.

There has been a dramatic disappearance of honeybees across the U.S. since 2006. A recent U.S. Department of Agriculture report blamed a combination of problems, including mites, disease, poor nutrition and pesticides.

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