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The Salt
7:03 am
Thu November 27, 2014

Can Breeders Cure What Ails Our Breast-Heavy Turkeys?

A 40-pound tom turkey flaps his wing as Chris Conley carries him to a pen at Raymond's Turkey Farm in Methuen, Mass., on Friday. The farm raises approximately 20,000 broad-breasted white turkeys per year.
Elise Amendola AP

Originally published on Thu November 27, 2014 11:19 am

Many Americans will be sitting down Thursday to a wonderfully meaty, broad-breasted white turkey that grew to maturity in a remarkably short period: just 136 days, on average.

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Code Switch
3:51 am
Thu November 27, 2014

Stories Of Your First Thanksgiving In The U.S.

We don't endorse using a trident to carve your turkey.
floodllama Flickr

Originally published on Thu November 27, 2014 12:12 pm

This past week, we called for stories about your first Thanksgiving in the United States. Who'd you spend it with? Where were you coming from? What'd you eat? What'd you think of it? we wondered.

And many of the stories we heard from you were about food: You had issues roasting the turkey properly. Your mom found, um, a creative solution to making your bird golden-brown. You ate a lot of different alternative Thanksgiving meals. Your stories were goofy and weird, but most of them made us smile. Here are some of them:

Leticia Ortiz

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Goats and Soda
3:50 am
Thu November 27, 2014

School For Husbands Gets Men To Talk About Family Size

They're participants in Niger's School for Husbands.
Ron Haviv/VII for NPR

Originally published on Thu November 27, 2014 1:28 pm

It's a bunch of guys sitting around talking.

About the benefits of birth control.

About how a woman should take care of herself when she's pregnant.

About breast-feeding.

You know, the kind of things guys never talk about.

There are 12 of them, sitting in a circle under a tin roof. Some wear long, colorful tunics. Their flip-flops are scattered around the outer edge of the carpet. They're part of the "School for Husbands" program in the village of Chadakori in the West African nation of Niger, the country with the highest birth rate in the world.

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Shots - Health News
3:49 am
Thu November 27, 2014

Millennial Doctors May Be More Tech-Savvy, But Is That Better?

Medical residents including Dr. Amy Ho (bottom right) helped with first aid at the Pitchfork Music Festival in Chicago.
Courtesy Amy Ho

Originally published on Thu November 27, 2014 12:12 pm

The University of Texas Southwestern class of 2014 is celebrating graduation. Class vice president Amy Ho has shed her scrubs for heels and a black dress. She says with modern technology, med school really wasn't too hard.

"If you want to do the whole thing by video stream, you can," she says. "I would wake up at 10 a.m., work out for an hour or so, get some lunch and then video stream for 6 hours and then go to happy hour. It actually was not that bad."

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The Two-Way
1:00 am
Thu November 27, 2014

In Ferguson And Across The Country, Protests Are More Subdued

Snow falls Wednesday night as Missouri National Guard members stand outside of the Ferguson Police Department in Ferguson, Mo.
Jeff Roberson AP

Originally published on Thu November 27, 2014 12:18 pm

Protests of Mondays grand jury decision were dampened somewhat on Wednesday night — particularly in Ferguson, Mo., where only a few dozen protesters braved the snow to demonstrate.

NPR's Elise Hu says things were fairly subdued there.

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Business
6:39 pm
Wed November 26, 2014

Jacksonville Split Over Joining A Southern Port Dredging Frenzy

Vince Cameron has worked the docks at the Port of Jacksonville for more than three decades. If the city doesn't deepen the port, he says, a new breed of massive cargo ship will instead go to Savannah, Ga., or Charleston, S.C.
Peter Haden WJCT News

Originally published on Wed November 26, 2014 8:01 pm

Vince Cameron knows all the people buzzing around the Port of Jacksonville in their bright blaze vests. "My dad was a longshoreman for 44 years on these docks before he retired," he says. "I'm a child of this port."

In his hard hat and with a whistle around his neck, Cameron looks on as a weathered Horizon Lines freighter pulls in from Puerto Rico.

The ship is "a baby in the whole scheme of things," says Cameron, president of the local longshoreman's union. "It's a good ship ... but she's kinda slow and she uses diesel fuel. I mean, she drinks it like water."

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Around the Nation
5:41 pm
Wed November 26, 2014

Texas Execution Nears For Murderer Whose Competence Was Debated

Texas death row inmate Scott Panetti has had a long history of mental illness but was allowed to defend himself at trial. He is scheduled to be executed next Wednesday.
AP

Originally published on Wed November 26, 2014 6:39 pm

On Dec. 3, Texas is scheduled to execute Scott Panetti for murdering his in-laws in 1992. There is no doubt he committed the crime, and there is also no doubt that Panetti is mentally ill. But he was deemed fit to stand trial, and he was allowed to defend himself, dressing in a cowboy costume in court, insisting he was a character from a John Wayne movie.

Over the course of the last two decades — and many appeals — his case has gained national attention, and it has shone a spotlight on capital punishment and mental illness.

A Diagnosis

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Parallels
5:22 pm
Wed November 26, 2014

Two Men's Efforts To Help Migrants In Mexico End In Their Murders

Two years ago, Honduran Wilson Castro was one of countless migrants trying to make his way to the United States. He decided to stay in Mexico instead and help Adrian Rodriguez Garcia feed other migrants traveling through by train. The two men were murdered recently in Huehuetoca, Mexico.
Carrie Kahn

Originally published on Wed November 26, 2014 9:29 pm

This is the story of the murder of two aid workers in Mexico. The men fed Central American migrants traveling north through Mexico on a freight train that stopped near their home.

They were critical of both corrupt police, who abused and extorted the migrants, as well as the organized crime gangs that kidnapped and robbed them.

It wasn't hard to find the two men — they were never far from the train tracks — but there were no witnesses to their deaths, and police won't comment about the case. The double homicide didn't even get a mention in the local press.

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Music Interviews
5:22 pm
Wed November 26, 2014

Sneak Peak: Conversation With Melissa Etheridge

Originally published on Wed November 26, 2014 6:39 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Tomorrow on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED, we're bringing you some Thanksgiving treats. We've got olives and celery, wild turkeys and also a wild rocker.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "MONSTER")

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Music Interviews
4:46 pm
Wed November 26, 2014

Naive, Yet Revolutionary: Ray Davies On 50 Years Of The Kinks

The Kinks in 1970.
Courtesy of Sanctuary Records

Originally published on Wed November 26, 2014 6:42 pm

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