News from National Public Radio

Shortly after arriving in Washington for diplomatic meetings this week, Egypt's foreign minister, Sameh Hassan Shoukry, stopped by NPR to speak with Morning Edition's David Greene.

Shoukry, a veteran diplomat and former ambassador to Washington, represents the government of Abdel Hassan el-Sisi, a former general who took power in 2013.

New Hampshire prides itself on surprising people with the outcome of its first-in-the-nation presidential primary. This year, though, the top winner in each party was the candidate the polls had long predicted would win.

So if there was any surprise, it was that the candidates those polls had been smiling on were Donald Trump and Bernie Sanders. Less than a year ago, neither would have been thought a likely candidate, let alone a plausible winner.

We all know live election coverage is hard — you have to cram a lot of quickly changing information into not a lot of time, and sometimes you forget to eat dinner. MSNBC's Chris Hayes must have been hungry, because here's what he said after Bernie Sanders was announced a winner:

When Carolyn Coyne's lab at the University of Pittsburgh recently tried to order a sample of Zika virus from a major laboratory supplier, they were told it was out of stock.

"They are actually back-ordered until July for the virus," Coyne says. "At least that's what we were told." She ended up obtaining Zika from another source, and it arrived at her lab Tuesday.

The international trade in exotic animal parts includes rhino horn, seahorses, and bear gall bladders. But perhaps none is as strange as the swim bladder from a giant Mexican fish called the totoaba.

The totoaba can grow to the size of a football player. It lives only in the Gulf of California in Mexico, along with the world's smallest and rarest mammal — a type of porpoise called the vaquita.

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