Around the Nation
4:00 am
Mon February 6, 2012

Komen Foundation Struggles To Lure Back Donors

Aurora Jewell, Mandi Moshay and Kirsten Dees (left to right) hold up signs following a press conference by U.S. Sen. Patty Murray (D-WA) outside at a Planned Parenthood Clinic in Seattle, on Feb. 3.
Stephen Brashear Getty Images

Originally published on Thu February 9, 2012 2:07 pm

The Susan G. Komen for the Cure Foundation is facing a fight to keep controversy from undermining its fundraising efforts.

After announcing that it would withdraw funding from Planned Parenthood screening programs last week — and then reversing that decision three days later — the foundation now faces the challenging task of repairing its image and trying to lure back disillusioned donors.

One of the nation's largest breast cancer charities, the foundation spends tens of millions of dollars annually on breast cancer research, education and screening.

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U.S.
3:25 am
Mon February 6, 2012

Unions Create TV Ad To Appeal To Young People

A new TV ad recently test-launched by the AFL-CIO discusses work, but never mentions unions specifically.
Courtesy of the AFL-CIO

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Shots - Health Blog
12:01 am
Mon February 6, 2012

The 'Morning After' Pill: How It Works And Who Uses It

Plan B is available over the counter for people 17 and older.
AP

Originally published on Thu February 14, 2013 11:52 am

Access to emergency contraception has swirled at the center of a recent flurry of debate over insurance coverage. It's a pill women can take if their birth control fails or they forget to use it.

The most popular brand of emergency contraception is called "Plan B One-Step." You might better know it as the morning-after pill. Today, about 10 percent of sexually active women say they've used it.

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Shots - Health Blog
12:01 am
Mon February 6, 2012

What Spermicide Users Should Know, But Often Don't

Many over-the-counter contraceptives contain a spermicide known as nonoxynol-9.
Gretchen Cuda Kroen For NPR

When Lisa Rentz decided she'd had enough of birth control pills, she walked into her local drug store and picked up something different: a vaginal contraceptive film that contains the spermicide nonoxynol-9, or n-9.

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Your Money
12:01 am
Mon February 6, 2012

In Idaho, Two Workers Take Jobs, And Hope For Best

When he was laid off in 2008., Nathan Bussey had been working for Hewlett-Packard for just under 10 years. He's now hoping to advance in his new job at a call center.
Molly Messick StateImpact Idaho

Originally published on Mon February 6, 2012 1:11 pm

StateImpact Idaho's Molly Messick reports on two people coping with the lingering effects of an economic downturn.

Before the recession, Idaho had one of the fastest growing economies in the country. But last year, its jobless rate peaked at nearly 10 percent. That number has begun to creep downward – but many workers in the state are still struggling to replace the jobs they've lost.

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The Salt
12:01 am
Mon February 6, 2012

California's Stevia Growers Bet On Fast Track To Sweetener Success

The S&W Seed Co., in Five Points, Calif., will grow these seedlings of zero-calorie stevia in the fields of California's Central Valley.
Dan Charles NPR

Originally published on Mon February 6, 2012 3:23 am

It's stevia time!

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Economy
5:39 pm
Sun February 5, 2012

Stopping The 'Brain Drain' Of The U.S. Economy

Recent surveys show that a large percentage of graduates from the nation's top schools are taking jobs in consulting or financial sector.
Mary Altaffer AP

Yale University student Marina Keegan received an email last May from Bridgewater Associates, one of the world's largest hedge funds, offering her $100 if she said why she didn't apply for a summer internship.

Keegan, an English major, decided to take Bridgewater up on its offer.

"It was only sort of once I was inside the room when I realized ... maybe I'm helping them perfect their recruiting machine, which is exactly what we were doing," Keegan tells weekends on All Things Considered host Guy Raz.

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Health
3:56 pm
Sun February 5, 2012

Fewer Autopsies Mean Crucial Info Goes To The Grave

Colleagues of Renee Royak-Schaler at the University of Maryland School of Medicine paid for and conducted an autopsy that revealed that cancer had ravaged her body. Today, autopsies are conducted on just 5 percent of patients.
Jenna Isaacson Pfueller ProPublica

Originally published on Tue May 8, 2012 3:52 pm

A half-century ago, autopsies — sometimes called the ultimate medical audit — were an integral part of American health care, performed on roughly half of all patients who died in hospitals. But today, autopsies are conducted on roughly 5 percent of such patients, and experts say that is a troubling trend.

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The Two-Way
12:09 pm
Sun February 5, 2012

Russia's Hottest Protest Song, Courtesy Of The Military Elite

A screen grab from the YouTube video, "Putin and the Paratroopers."
YouTube

An Internet hit is becoming the anthem for Russian protesters as they march against Vladimir Putin's rule.

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