Governing
3:40 am
Tue February 12, 2013

Treasury Nominee's Citigroup Experience Raises Questions For Some

Jack Lew testifies before a House budget panel in 2011. The Senate Finance Committee is scheduled to consider Lew's nomination to be Treasury secretary on Wednesday.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Tue February 12, 2013 9:02 am

Jack Lew, the man President Obama has chosen to help oversee the country's biggest banks, has said it plainly — he's no expert on banking. Lew said as much when the Senate was vetting him to head the White House Office of Management and Budget in 2010.

Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., asked Lew if he thought deregulation of Wall Street caused the financial crisis. Lew said he didn't consider himself the best person to answer that question.

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National Security
3:25 am
Tue February 12, 2013

In Cyberwar, Software Flaws Are A Hot Commodity

An analyst looks at code in the malware lab of a cybersecurity defense lab at the Idaho National Laboratory in Idaho Falls, Idaho, Sept. 29, 2011.
Jim Urquhart Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Tue February 12, 2013 8:50 am

There have been security flaws in software as long as there has been software, but they have become even more critically important in the context of cyberweapons development.

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The Two-Way
6:47 pm
Mon February 11, 2013

Another Shiny Object Seen In Pictures From Mars Is Now Explained

The image, taken by Mars rover Curiosity in January has sparked debate because of the shiny object marked by the yellow arrow.
NASA/JPL-Caltech/Malin Space Science Systems

Last week, a blogger at Universe Today began a bit of an Internet frenzy when a reader spotted a shiny object in one of the pictures taken on Mars by the Curiosity rover.

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Gabe Bullard joined WFPL in 2008 as a reporter on the city politics beat. Since then, he's reported, blogged, hosted and edited during elections, severe weather and the Fairdale Sasquatch scare of 2009. Before coming to Louisville, Gabe lived in St. Louis, which was his home base for years of growing up, studying and interning at various media outlets around the country. 

News
6:25 pm
Mon February 11, 2013

Pope's Resignation Spurs Talk Of 'Global South' Successor

A child prays with his rosary at a Catholic church in Lagos, Nigeria, on Monday. In Africa, where the Catholic Church continues to grow, worshippers and clergy greeted Pope Benedict XVI's announcement that he planned to resign with hopes that the continent would see one of its own rise to lead the faithful.
Sunday Alamba AP

Originally published on Mon February 11, 2013 7:58 pm

A worldwide Catholic conversation that many church-watchers say effectively stopped when Benedict XVI was elected pope eight years ago has been rekindled by his announced plan to resign at month's end.

Celibacy. Women's roles. Same-sex marriage. Clergy sexual abuse revelations.

And, perhaps most significantly, the spectacular growth of the church in the more religiously conservative "global south" — Latin America, Africa and Asia — while its fortunes continue to decline in the increasingly secular West.

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The Salt
6:22 pm
Mon February 11, 2013

Less Potent Maker's Mark Not Going Down Smoothly In Kentucky

With too little distilled bourbon to meet demand, Maker's Mark is lowering the product's alcohol content from 90 to 84 proof.
Ed Reinke AP

Originally published on Mon February 11, 2013 7:58 pm

Kentucky is bourbon country. Bar shelves in Louisville are stocked with a crowded field of premium bourbons; the city's Theater Square Marketplace restaurant alone carries close to 170 different brands. So when news trickled out that longtime distillery Maker's Mark plans to water down its bourbon, locals were stunned.

Bourbon has to be aged at least two years — and that's where Maker's Mark got in trouble. Chief Operating Officer Rob Samuels says the company simply didn't make enough.

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Asia
6:16 pm
Mon February 11, 2013

Despite Young Leader, N. Korea Still Cranks Out Old-Style Propaganda

North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, accompanied by his wife, Ri Sol Ju, in a photo released last summer. For North Koreans, it was stunning to see the first lady at the leader's side. But North Korea still produces heavy-handed propaganda as well.
Uncredited AP

Originally published on Tue February 12, 2013 8:57 am

Ahead of North Korea's latest nuclear test, the country launched a preemptive barrage of propaganda aimed at the West. But in the age of the Internet, has such ham-fisted messaging lost its punch?

The latest North Korean video, released on YouTube last week in apparent anticipation of Tuesday's test, is something of an amateurish production.

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It's All Politics
5:29 pm
Mon February 11, 2013

Report: Emails Show Sen. Menendez Focused On Port Security Contract

Originally published on Mon February 11, 2013 5:47 pm

Emails between Sen. Robert Menendez's office and the Department of Homeland Security suggest that the New Jersey Democrat urged action that would help a company holding a port security contract in the Dominican Republic, The New York Times reported Monday.

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Under The Label: Sustainable Seafood
5:13 pm
Mon February 11, 2013

Is Sustainable-Labeled Seafood Really Sustainable?

Capt. Art Gaeten holds a blue shark that was caught during a research trip in Nova Scotia. Scientists are studying the impact of swordfish fishing methods on the shark population.
Dean Casavechia for NPR

Originally published on Wed February 13, 2013 1:19 pm

Part one of a three-part series by Daniel Zwerdling and Margot Williams.

Rebecca Weel pushes a baby stroller with her 18-month-old up to the seafood case at Whole Foods, near ground zero in New York. As she peers at shiny fillets of salmon, halibut and Chilean sea bass labeled "certified sustainable," Weel believes that if she purchases this seafood, she will help protect the world's oceans from overfishing.

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Middle East
5:12 pm
Mon February 11, 2013

Women In Prayer Shawls Detained At Judaism's Holiest Site

Rabbi Susan Silverman (center, left), the sister of American comedian Sarah Silverman, along with her teenage daughter Hallel Abramowitz (center, right), are arrested by Israeli police as they leave the Western Wall in Jerusalem, on Monday.
Jim Hollander EPA/Landov

Originally published on Thu February 21, 2013 9:40 am

Police in Jerusalem on Monday detained 10 women for wearing the tallit, a Jewish prayer shawl traditionally worn by men, while praying at the Western Wall.

The Women of the Wall have been fighting for years for permission to worship in the manner that men do at the Western Wall, the holiest site in Judaism for prayer. The stone structure is part of the retaining wall that surrounded the Second Jewish Temple, which was destroyed by the Romans in A.D. 70.

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