It's All Politics
8:16 am
Tue November 6, 2012

Voting Queue Etiquette: Hey, Buddy, That's Out Of Line!

South Floridians stood in long lines Sunday during the last day of early voting in Miami.
Alan Diaz AP

Originally published on Tue November 6, 2012 10:17 am

For most of us, Election Day marks a welcome end to months of relentless political ads and partisan bickering. You show up at your polling place, run the gantlet of sign-wielding campaign volunteers, and join your fellow Americans in long lines that inch toward the voting booth.

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The Two-Way
8:02 am
Tue November 6, 2012

It's Election Day: 10 Headlines That Tell Today's Story

A woman is accompanied by her dog as she casts her vote on in South Philadelphia, Pa.
Jessica Kourkounis Getty Images

Originally published on Tue November 6, 2012 8:08 am

It's finally here! It's Election Day. After months of campaigning and some $2 billion spent by both campaigns, it means political junkies will finally get some answers and those who aren't too enamored with Washington, will stop seeing ads on TV.

With that, here are 10 headlines that tell today's story:

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It's All Politics
7:03 am
Tue November 6, 2012

Guide For The Day: An Election Day Timeline

Voters fill out their ballots on the first day of early voting on Oct. 27 in Miami.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

The finish line is in sight as voters make their final decisions on Election Day. Here's a guide to key times of the day across the nation. Stay with NPR throughout the day as we follow the presidential race and key battles that will determine control of the House and Senate.

Join NPR to hear live coverage, which begins at 8 p.m. EST on NPR.org and many member stations.

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It's All Politics
7:01 am
Tue November 6, 2012

The Battle For Congress: Senate And House Races To Watch

Sen. Scott Brown, R-Mass., shakes hands with Democratic challenger Elizabeth Warren at their Oct. 1 debate in Lowell, Mass. The race is one of a handful of contests that could determine party control of the Senate.
Charles Krupa AP

Originally published on Tue November 6, 2012 7:02 pm

For Republicans itching to regain control of the Senate, Tuesday's election presents a rare opportunity. Only 10 GOP incumbents are on the ballot, compared with nearly two dozen Democrats and independents who caucus with them.

That means the magic number for Republicans is low. They need only a net gain of three or four seats to take over the Senate — and, assuming they keep the U.S. House of Representatives, consolidate their influence on Capitol Hill. Democrats need to pick up 25 seats to seize the House, a goal that political analysts consider all but out of reach.

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It's All Politics
6:58 am
Tue November 6, 2012

Voters To Settle Tight And Turbulent Presidential Battle

Supporters attend a Mitt Romney rally Monday in Columbus, Ohio.
Emmanuel Dunand AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue November 6, 2012 8:08 am

As Americans go to the polls, one of the closest presidential races in years may be determined by a state in the Midwest and a hurricane named Sandy.

After a campaign that has cost some $6 billion, the two candidates are in the same place they started: with President Obama a smidgen ahead of challenger Mitt Romney, so close that differences are in most cases statistically insignificant.

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It's All Politics
6:58 am
Tue November 6, 2012

GOP Eyes Gains As Voters In 11 States Pick Governors

New Hampshire gubernatorial candidates Democrat Maggie Hassan and Republican Ovide Lamontagne talk before their Oct. 4 debate in Henniker, N.H.
Jim Cole AP

Originally published on Tue November 6, 2012 9:03 pm

Voters in 11 states will pick their governors tonight, and Republicans appear on track to increase their numbers by at least one, with the potential to extend their hold to more than two-thirds of the nation's top state offices.

Eight of the gubernatorial seats up for grabs are now held by Democrats; three are in Republican hands. Republicans currently hold 29 governorships, Democrats have 20, and Rhode Island's Gov. Lincoln Chafee is an Independent.

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Statewide Races
3:20 am
Tue November 6, 2012

Florida's New Battleground: The State Supreme Court

Speaking at the University of Florida in Gainesville, state Supreme Court Justice Fred Lewis said Florida's courts should be independent. Lewis is one of three justices fighting to keep his seat.
Matt Stamey Gainesville Sun /Landov

Originally published on Tue November 6, 2012 12:18 pm

In Florida, Supreme Court justices are nominated by a commission and appointed by the governor. Every six years, they're up for retention. Voters decide whether to keep them on the bench or let them go.

Since the system was put in place in the 1970s, retention votes have been pro forma affairs, with justices doing little fundraising or campaigning.

But this year is different.

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Superstorm Sandy: Before, During And Beyond
3:19 am
Tue November 6, 2012

Norfolk, Va., Puts Flooding Survival Plan To The Test

Motorists drive through standing water at an intersection flooded from the remnants of Tropical Storm Ida in the Ocean View area of Norfolk, Va., in November 2009.
Steve Helber AP

Originally published on Tue November 6, 2012 12:18 pm

Superstorm Sandy got officials in New York and New Jersey talking about how to prevent flooding in a time of global warming and sea level rise.

But the place on the East Coast that's most vulnerable to flooding is several hundred miles south, around Norfolk, Va. — and Norfolk has already spent many years studying how to survive the rising waters.

Scientists say what Norfolk has learned is especially important in light of new research showing that the coastline from North Carolina to Boston will experience even more sea level rise than other areas.

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It's All Politics
6:07 pm
Mon November 5, 2012

Last Of The Early Voters In Ohio Make A Scene

Mimes perform at the Franklin County Early Voting Center in Columbus, Ohio, on Sunday.
Courtesy Karen Kasler

For thousands of voters in Ohio, Election Day is going to be a day of rest — because they worked hard to vote on Sunday.

Thousands stood in long lines at voting sites in northeast Ohio, in southwest Ohio and in central Ohio. But the Franklin County Early Voting Center may have had the most carnival-like atmosphere.

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It's All Politics
5:51 pm
Mon November 5, 2012

Crossroads GPS Redefines 'Social Welfare' Political Action

Karl Rove, the founder of Crossroads GPS and a former adviser to President George W. Bush, at the Republican National Convention in Tampa, Fla., on Aug. 28.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

Originally published on Mon November 5, 2012 7:12 pm

With all the really big numbers flying around this campaign season, here's one more: $165,062,250.

That's how much Karl Rove's Crossroads GPS has spent attacking Democrats and helping Republicans this election. Perhaps this number doesn't seem so special, compared with the $1 billion spent by President Obama's campaign and at least $900 million by Gov. Romney's team.

There is one critical difference, though.

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